Sunday, June 23, 2013

HHA Sports West Coast Pro Staff

Recently, I reviewed the Optimizer Lite Ultra single-pin archery sight from HHA Sports. I have been asked why I changed from a 7-pin set-up and how a shooting single-pin benefits the bowhunter. To be honest, there have been some really great questions and I have tried to answer them all. (If I missed yours, please let me know!)

When I was approached by HHA Sports to join their Pro Staff I accepted without hesitation! Representing companies whose products I trust and believe in makes me feel great. I stand by the products I represent - otherwise what would be the point? I stand by HHA Sports because they make a quality product right here in the U.S.A and they offer great customer service. If you need an answer, you'll get it and get it quick. As a bowhunter and an all-around busy guy I appreciate the fast, quality service HHA provides.

You see, I have been shooting their single-pin sight for a little while now and I love it. You can read my first impression and my full gear review to understand why I love this sight so much. I am proud to be representing HHA Sports as their very first West Coast Pro Staffer! I am stoked (a West Coast word I have become very fond of) and hope to grow the HHA community out here in SoCal. If you see me at the archery range or want to meet up to discuss archery or bowhunting, shoot me an email and let's make it happen!

6 comments:

  1. Congrats on the Pro Staff Al. I have to admit I am intrigued by the single pin set up. Would like to know how well it works in the field, against a real animal though. With a single pin you would have to be able to quickly adjust your yardage before hooking your release. Then is the animal moves, how do you adjust. Seems like it could cause allot of problems. Just my thoughts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's an interesting take, Philip. I think that with any hunt, single-pin or multi-pin sight, the animal can and often will move. One factor you left out of this equation is the use of a range finder. If you use one you will have to unhook your release, range the animal, adjust your sight, rehook the release, draw and then shoot. But it all happens much faster than that and if you haven't spooked the animal you have plenty of time to do it all. The advantage of the single-pin is that you can dial it in for the exact distance to where the animal is. No guessing. If the animal is at 43 yards, you set it for 43. With the multi-pin sights you use your 40 yard pin and aim slightly higher. There's a bit of guesswork involved, but not with the HHA Optimizer.

      I highly recommend trying one out and seeing how it will improve your shooting. Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
  2. Congrats Al! That's awesome. To continue with the comment I think you nailed it on the head Al. I thought the same thing as Philip did and thought that it would be a lot of work and movement, but just as you stated that's where you would be guessing is in that in between distance. I wouldn't hesitate to range an animal at 43 yards, see it move a couple steps and shoot the animal without adjusting. Just my two cents as well. Obviously if it moved quiet a bit then yeah I would range the animal again and then adjust accordingly. Either way there is going to be movement when you are ranging an animal and adjusting to shoot with either set up.

    I definitely am interested in the single pin, my seven pin is getting pretty crowded. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, Dustin. My 7 pins filled up half of my sight window and it was driving me crazy. Once I switched to a single-vertical pin sight my confidence improved as I was hitting the sweet spot of the target from 60+ yards. I love my HHA sight!

      Delete
  3. I recently made the switch and don't think I'll ever go back to multi-pin sights. My groups are far tighter at all ranges. I hunt in pretty thick cover and most of my shots are under 30 yards. I will hunt with my HHA at 25 yards this fall. I'm about an inch low at 30 and an inch high at 20. That is plenty of room for error on a whitetail. If I were hunting food plots, I would probably set it at 40 and adjust as needed based on the range finder. The improvement in accuracy is astounding. I probably wouldn't believe it if I didn't see it myself!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent tip on your set-up, Chris. That is good advice so that treestand hunters don't get too worried about having to adjust the sight each and every time a deer walk into a shooting lane. Range the lane and know where your sight is set at. Best of luck this season!

      Delete